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Fire & Water - Cleanup & Restoration

Commercial Mold Remediation Guidelines

7/23/2018 (Permalink)

Commercial Commercial Mold Remediation Guidelines If the answer to each of these questions is “yes,” the remediation plan meets the mold standards recommended by EPA and IICRC guidelines.

By the time you smell the distinctive musty odor, you have lost half the battle. Water damage or moisture has sparked the growth of black mold in your commercial building and left unchecked, the insidious fungus can do massive damage. Clearly, immediate steps must be taken to secure the property. The only question now is what sort of guidelines or mold standards for cleanup should you follow in Watertown, NY?

Make a Plan

There are no federal rules that a commercial property owner must adhere to when it comes to mold clean up, but the EPA provided broad guidelines in the 2008 brochure Mold Remediation in Schools and Commercial Buildings. First and foremost, it is important to assess the scale of the issue and form a remediation plan. Any strategy for cleanup and repair should follow these principles:

• Identify and fix the water or humidity issue.
• Communicate with employees and/or other building occupants.
• Clean up mold and dry all water-damaged areas.
• Select appropriate cleaning and drying methods and tools.
• Remove mold-damaged building materials.
• Arrange for professional help, as needed, from restoration specialists in [City, State].

If professional help is required, it is important to hire a firm and/or technician accredited by the Institute of Inspection, Cleaning and Restoration Certification. The IICRC’s own mold standards require a written assessment and detailed action plan. All black mold must be eradicated by use of EPA-approved fungicides.

Follow the Plan

The EPA brochure also provides tips for preferred cleanup methods and removal and disposal of affected building materials. Pages of guidelines for such are included, along with a simple checklist to determine if the remediation plan has been a success:

• Has the instigating water/moisture issue been addressed and repaired?
• Have all materials affected by mold been thoroughly cleaned of the fungus and/or removed and replaced?
• Does the site visually appear mold-free with no signs of water damage?

If the answer to each of these questions is “yes,” the remediation plan meets the mold standards recommended by EPA and IICRC guidelines.
For more information, visit http://www.SERVPROjeffersoncounty.com/.

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